Reviews


Reviews of Four

Disclaimer: these reviews were originally published in Dutch, and then translated by us.

Written In Music, November 2016
Muziekwereld, November 2016
de Muziekexpress, November 2016
daMusic.be, January 2017
Heaven, March – April 2017
Mania, april 2017

Concert reviews

Written In Music, December 2016



Edwin Hofman in Written In Music, November 2016

The Dutch was one of the best Dutch bands in the first half of the eighties. With intelligent, well-composed songs and a reasonably accessible sound the quartet made their mark, even without scoring really big hits. In 1987, the band split up and for years it seemed that the back catalogue would be confined to a few compilations and a recurring spot on retro playlists.

Two years after a one-off reunion gig at the Amsterdam venue Paradiso there is a new record: Four . The Dutch are, as in the best years, Hans Croon (vocals / guitar), Bert Croon (keyboards / vocals), Klaas Jonkmans (drums / vocals) and Jan de Kruijf (bass guitar). The music on the album has little resemblance with the sound of that time. As there was, and is, no “formula” yielding a typical Dutch song, Four can not be simply classified as ‘indie’, ‘rock,’ ‘new wave’ or ‘pop’. It is all that and a little more. Hans Croon’s pleasant voice is in any case well in shape and just like before, it gives the band its specific sound.

With fourteen songs, Four is quite richly endowed but that means there’s a lot of things happening on the album. We did not expect anything else, of course, though it is nice to still be able to add some new highlights to the Dutch-discography anno 2016. That certainly applies to Brighton & Hove, a particularly nice ode to a tolerant, open city: “Anything goes in Brighton & Hove”. Also Isle Of U is great. Here enter the horns, that regularly assist the band on this album.

Fine Shields We Are is the bold single. Fine motifs and guitars color this song that denounces ‘fortress Europe’. Pretty soon the continent will be a minefield. “It’s cold outside / So come in and hide.” Left Of Centre is a beautiful acoustic ballad ( “Everyone else in the world turning right, but I’m left of center). Basically Your Love is about aging and its lingering, moody character, strings and organ reflect a moment of peace and introspection.

And that’s not all. Money , the rocking opening song, is great and in other songs The Dutch sound remarkable, as in Is This Your House somewhat an extension of the work from the eighties, or the smooth, well-sounding pop-rock of Mr. Taxi Driver and This Train Is About To Explode .

No lack of inspiration therefore in the band that said they probably should have stayed together in 1987. Anyway, The Dutch are back on stage at the Paradiso (Upper Room) December 1st, backed by a considerably longer discography than before. Resulting in another fine set list full of new and old songs. The show is sold out by now.



rakenDra Smit in Muziekwereld, November 2016

The Dutch started in 1979 as a new wave band. The general public knew them especially from the catchy but modest hit This Is Welfare and their live performance in 1983 at the great anti-nuclear demonstration on the Malieveld in The Hague. In 1986 it was over … at least, so it seemed, until 2014, when a few of their albums were re-released digitally by Sony. The band came back together for what seemed a one-off gig at the Amsterdam Paradiso. But that went so well that they decided to write and record new material. The result is ‘Four’. There are fourteen catchy pop songs on the album, intelligent, musically and socially engaged as before. The compositions, arrangements, production and sound are entirely contemporary. Singer Hans Croon has left his ‘new wave’ voice in the archives and produces a new unique sound on this record. The same applies to the whole group that has reinvented itself musically with this CD. A strong comeback, this fourth album!



Marco van Lochem in the Muziekexpress, November 2016

You may know The Dutch from the Dutch pop classic “THIS IS WELFARE” in 1983. After this single, the band went on for a number of years, but they could not repeat their hit success, although “ANOTHER SUNNY DAY” in 1985 came close. The Dutch broke up, and the members continued to do make music, but not under the name The Dutch. In 2014, record label Sony released the albums “THIS IS WELFARE” and “UNDER THE SURFACE” again through the digital media. The band did a one-off show to promote the re-releases and ultimately the studio technician Wout de Kruif urged the band to come together again. The result is “FOUR”, the new album by The Dutch. You hear a sprightly band that does not stick to one style. There are strings, winds and various percussion instruments in the songs, which emits a dazzling palette of styles. It’s all incredibly well composed and then I still haven’t mentioned the lyrics. Political (“FINE SHIELDS WE ARE”), very personal (“FATHER”), but also narrative texts can be heard during the 14 tracks that pass in over 53 minutes. It all sounds good, there is good musicianship and Hans Croon has a sometimes fragile, but also distinctive voice, giving the songs their distinctive quality. The Dutch are back and we can be proud of it!



Patrick van Gestel in daMusic.be, januari 2017

Almost forgotten, but wrongly, as it turns out: The Dutch!

The Dutch, successful for a short while in the eighties with that still outstanding album This Is Welfare, on which among others a catchy, piano nominated title track, reminiscent of the best of Joe Jackson. That band is now back, after thirty (!) years.

The angry young men have now become middle-aged men. Although the original enthusiasm had ended in a split, the musicians remained restless and so the foursome around the brothers Hans and Bert Croon went back to work. Four is the result.

First observation: the bright piano sound on This Is Welfare that we were so charmed by and fell in love with is gone. Bert Croon’s piano is still there, but it’s more hidden. And then you’ll find it in a track called Basically Your Love. But what’s lacking is a little panache. Not counting the cameo in Mr. Taxi Driver.

The woolly bass sound, so typical of the eighties, can be heard in the beginning of Is This Your House, but it has largely disappeared otherwise. As frontman and guitarist Hans Croon says in the booklet, The Dutch from the eighties is different from the new Dutch. And we respect that. It is also true that this record is nothing like what they did in those years. Somewhat regrettable, but also courageous.

In any case, there’s no lack of inspiration. Four contains fourteen songs and about fifty minutes of music. And the feeling for song writing is still there. The truly adventurous may have disappeared a little, it starts promising. More than that, we were surprised when Hans Croon’s guitar in the opener Money pulled us into the music. Something he even repeats in the single Fine Shields We Are. In Brighton And Hove, the (female) backing vocals and crisp guitar solo hold the attention.

At the end Bye, Ministry Man even recalls Bungalow Bill (The Beatles). And the horns in Father are enjoyable and enriching. They don’t reveal their secrets right away, these songs. However, we must admit that in between they sometimes lose us, perhaps because of the length of the album.

These are songs that were made with craftsmanship. Perhaps they are hard to find in the extensive musical landscape that nowadays you have to search looking for the icing on the cake. But still these are fine pop songs, which will definitely stimulate your neurons if you give them some time.



Joop van Rossum in Heaven, March-April 2017

Between 1979 and 1986, the Amstelveen based pop group The Dutch was active. Their second album, a mini with five songs, held the hit single This Is Welfare, beloved in national radio station Hilversum 3 on the days Vara and KRO aired. The quintet was known as intelligent, professional and musically gifted. Two years ago, the members of The Dutch decided to reunite with an eighty percent identical lineup, only guitarist Klaas ten Holt missing. Hans Croon wrote the lyrics for the fourteen new songs and composed the music together with his brother Bert Croon (keyboards, vocals), Jan de Kruijf (bass, keyboards, guitar, programming) and Klaas Jonkmans (drums, vocals). The men seem to have left the new wave sound behind and now focus on pleasant pop / rock songs, without the lyrics becoming superficial. For instance, the beautiful single Fine Shields We Are is about securing our territory with walls and barbed wire. Online privacy is central to Copy That Line.

Other top tracks are Money, Brighton and Hove, You Can’t Be Wrong (trumpet), Left Of Centre and Basically Your Love. Welcome back, guys.



Albert Jonker in Mania, April 2017

In 2014, the albums This Is Welfare (known for the 1983’s unique and timeless cult classical hit, 25 in the Dutch Top 40) and Under The Surface (with the only other attempt at Top 40’s success, Another Sunny Day, stranded incomprehensibly in the Tipparade) were released on hip digital music media. These two masterpieces didn’t seem to be outdone and in 1987 the Dutch stopped, despite much attention from the VARA radio and a performance during the 1984 national anti-nuclear weapon demonstration on The Hague’s Malieveld. The lyrics of The Dutch are still full of social criticism in 2017; refugees and online privacy are typical themes and gloomy as the dark side of the eighties.
Alternated with personal and narrative songs, Four is equally accessible and modern as the entire previous oeuvre of the intelligent and originally playing The Dutch. Like one says in good Dutch, still going strong!


Concert reviews

Edwin Hofman in Written In Music, December 2016

The Dutch back in Paradiso with new album

Two years after the ‘reunion show’, celebrating the re-release of two albums of The Dutch, the band are in the upper room of Paradiso again. This time the quartet presents a new album: Four.

At the start, singer / guitarist Hans Croon mentions that they will play all the tracks of Four. So tonight will not be a trip down memory lane, that much is clear. The band begins with the heavy album opener Money and then a four piece horn section joins the band on the stage of the sold out Paradiso to invigorate the great song Brighton & Hove. The band sounds tight anyway and with four vocal microphones and (sometimes) the horns, it definitely is a powerful performance.

Basically Your Love is also played beautifully and the band deals a blow to the US president-elect with Bye, Ministry Man – although when writing this song the band had an electoral defeat for Mr Trump in mind. Mr Taxi Driver remains noteworthy and to further enrich the sound of the band, Croon reaches for the 12-string guitar. His brother Bert (keyboards / vocals) plays the mandolin in the fine song Left Of Centre. It only adds to the color and richness of the performance. Is This Your House, with its high impact bass riff, reminds us of the new wave sound of yesteryear. The Dutch is not a one trick pony.

The only old song between the new work is, surprisingly, Out Here Where The Caveman Dwells, the b-side of the single America from 1985, which was also on the album Under The Surface. After this, the recent single Fine Shields We Are, getting a fiery performance and Copy That Line, about online privacy, with an almost eerie intro ( “I’m scared!”) especially stand out.

With the horn section on stage the show, that gradually grew stronger and stronger during the evening, ends with the highly personal song Father and the more uplifting You Can’t Be Wrong, both played with conviction. The Dutch soon comes back for an encore and play – thank you – the grooving Nous Sommes Très Petits from 1982 and the “hit” This Is Welfare, a song that was stunningly beautiful and 33 years later still is in the Paradiso. This first-rate encore puts a hearty exclamation mark behind a great performance.

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